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AMC climbs 9% as CEO makes pledge not to sell any shares that get newly authorized this year (AMC, RUT)

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adam aron, AMC CEO

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AMC Entertainment shares climbed as much as 9% on Thursday after CEO Adam Aron said it will not sell in 2021 any of the 500 million shares it's asked investors to authorize.

The company's shareholders will vote on May 4 on whether to approve AMC's request to increase its number of shares outstanding, which Aron plans to deploy in the coming years.

"We hereby pledge at AMC that if the shareholders approve this authorization for 500 million new shares to be issued, we will not use one of those 500 million shares in calendar year 2021. Not one," CEO Adam Aron said in an interview published Wednesday on a YouTube program called Trey's Trades, hosted by an independent investor.

AMC included Aron's comments in a Thursday filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company has roughly 450 million shares outstanding, according to Bloomberg.

The movie-theater operator has been working to recover from the hit the business took from the COVID-19 pandemic. The chain recently started to reopen its theaters after they closed to help reduce the spread of the respiratory disease.

Aron said in the YouTube interview that AMC still has about 43 million shares outstanding that were authorized in 2013. The company could use those shares to raise cash in the short-term if needed but that no decisions have yet been made on that matter, he said.

Asking for authorization to issue 500 million shares is part of the company's preparation for operations on a longer-term basis, Aron said.

"If you give us the flexibility to use those shares when it makes sense for you, the shareholder, that's when we'll use them and not before," said Aron.

AMC stock has surged from about $2 at the start of this year in part during major short-squeeze rallies that were fueled by retail investors active on Reddit's Wall Street Bets forum. Shares are up more than 365% year-to-date.

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The top 9 movies on Netflix this week, from 'Thunder Force' to 'Saving Private Ryan'

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thunder force netflix

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9. "Two Distant Strangers" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "In this Oscar-nominated short film, a man trying to go home to his dog gets stuck in a time loop that forces him to relive a deadly run-in with a cop."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A

What critics said: N/A



8. "What Lies Below" (2020)

Description: "Back home at her lake house, a teenager begins to suspect that a sinister force lurks beneath the surface of her mother's too-perfect new lover."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 62%

What critics said: "What Lies Below mostly coasts on its never-fully exploited main scenario: what would you do if an attractive eccentric tried to be your stepfather?"— RogerEbert.com



7. "Saving Private Ryan" (1998)

Description: "Eight U.S. Army Rangers penetrate German-held territory during World War II to find and bring home a soldier whose three brothers have been killed."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 93%

What critics said: "An old-fashioned war picture to rule them all — gripping, utterly uncynical, with viscerally convincing and audacious battle sequences."— Guardian



6. "The Stand In" (2020)

Description:"Her career in shambles, a reclusive movie star hires her stand-in to go to rehab for her, not expecting how much the look-alike will relish the role."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 30%

What critics said: "What's a bigger offense than a movie wasting away a committed Drew Barrymore performance? That would be a movie wasting away two committed Drew Barrymore performances."— Variety



5. "Concrete Cowboy" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "Sent to live with his estranged father for the summer, a rebellious teen finds kinship in a tight-knit Philadelphia community of Black cowboys."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 79%

What critics said: "Your classic story about an irritable young man redeemed by an animal, and the embrace of a community. But it's satisfying even so, largely because watching Elba is such a pleasure."— Time



4. "Legally Blonde" (2001)

Description: "When dazzling L.A. sorority girl Elle Woods gets dumped by her snobby boyfriend, she decides to win him back by following him to Harvard Law School."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 70%

What critics said: "Funny, enjoyable and, above all, relaxing. You won't need much brain power, but you'll certainly have fun."— BBC



3. "Sniper: Ghost Shooter" (2016)

Description: "Snipers ordered to protect a gas pipeline from terrorists suspect a security breach when they're targeted by a ghost shooter who knows their location."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A

What critics said: N/A



2. "The Little Rascals" (1994)

Description: "As Alfalfa tries to charm Darla, a group of pint-sized mischief-makers land in all sorts of antics. Inspired by Hal Roach's 'Our Gang' series."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 23%

What critics said: "A dismal kids' comedy in which all creativity stopped after casting lookalikes for the old 'rascals' was completed."— Chicago Tribune



1. "Thunder Force" (2021, Netflix original)

Description:"Two childhood best friends reunite as an unlikely crime-fighting superhero duo when one invents a formula that gives ordinary people superpowers."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 25%

What critics said: "Thunder Force might help illustrate why there are so few pure superhero comedy movies ... It's almost as if being a superhero is hard, but being funny is much harder."— Polygon



The 24 actors who have gotten the most Oscar nominations without winning one

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Glenn close the wife

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Each year, deserving performances lose out in the Oscars' best acting categories. But there are a handful of great actors that the Academy has repeatedly nominated and neglected. 

This year, Glenn Close is nominated her eighth time for her role in Netflix's "Hillbilly Elegy." If she loses again, she'll be tied with Peter O'Toole as the actor with the most Oscar nominations without a win (though O'Toole won an honorary Oscar).

Close was nominated two years ago in the lead actress category for "The Wife" and was the perceived frontrunner — until she lost to Olivia Colman.

Joaquin Phoenix and Brad Pitt turned their luck around last year. They both scored their first acting wins on their fourth nomination, Phoenix for lead actor for "Joker" and Pitt for supporting actor for "Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood."

Others haven't been so lucky. 

John Lynch contributed to a previous version of this post.

Here are the 24 actors who have been nominated for at least four acting Oscars without winning once:

SEE ALSO: The Oscars snubs this year were glaring, but the 2019 box office shows why Hollywood's future is bright

Saoirse Ronan — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations:"Brooklyn" (2015), "Lady Bird" (2017), "Little Women" (2019)

Best supporting actress nominations:"Atonement" (2007)



Bradley Cooper — 4 nominations

Best actor nominations:"Silver Linings Playbook" (2012), "American Sniper" (2014), "A Star Is Born" (2018)

Best supporting actor nominations: "American Hustle" (2013)



Willem Dafoe — 4 nominations

Best actor nominations:"At Eternity's Gate" (2018)

Best supporting actor nominations:"Platoon" (1986), "Shadow of a Vampire" (2000), "The Florida Project" (2017)



Michelle Williams — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations: "Blue Valentine" (2010), "My Week with Marilyn" (2011)

Best supporting actress nominations:"Brokeback Mountain" (2005), "Manchester by the Sea" (2016)



Barbara Stanwyck — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations: "Stella Dallas" (1937), "Ball of Fire" (1941), "Double Indemnity" (1944), "Sorry, Wrong Number" (1948)

Stanwyck received the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement in 1981.



Rosalind Russell — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations: "My Sister Eileen" (1942), "Sister Kenny" (1946), "Mourning Becomes Electra" (1947), "Auntie Mame" (1958)



Mickey Rooney — 4 nominations

Best actor nominations: "Babe in Arms" (1939), "The Human Comedy" (1943)

Best supporting actor nominations: "The Bold and the Brave" (1956), "The Black Stallion" (1979)

Rooney received the since-discontinued Academy Juvenile Award in 1938 and the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement in 1982.



Claude Rains — 4 nominations

Best supporting actor nominations: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Casablanca (1942), Mr. Skeffington (1944), Notorious (1946)



Ed Harris — 4 nominations

Best actor nomination: "Pollock" (2000)

Best supporting actor nominations: "Apollo 13" (1995), "The Truman Show" (1998), "The Hours" (2002)



Agnes Moorehead — 4 nominations

Best supporting actress nominations: "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942), "Mrs. Parkington" (1944), "Johnny Belinda" (1948), "Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte" (1964)



Marsha Mason — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations:"Cinderella Liberty" (1973), "The Goodbye Girl" (1977), "Chapter Two" (1979), "Only When I Laugh" (1981)



Montgomery Clift — 4 nominations

Best actor nominations: "The Search" (1948), "A Place in the Sun" (1951), "From Here to Eternity" (1953)

Best supporting actor nomination: "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961)



Charles Boyer — 4 nominations

Best actor nominations: "Conquest" (1937), "Algiers" (1938), "Gaslight" (1944), "Fanny" (1961)



Annette Bening — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations: "American Beauty" (1999), "Being Julia" (2004), "The Kids Are All Right" (2010)

Best supporting actress nomination: "The Grifters" (1990)



Jane Alexander — 4 nominations

Best actress nominations: "The Great White Hope" (1970), "Testament" (1983)

Best supporting actress nominations:"All the President's Men" (1976), "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979)



Arthur Kennedy — 5 nominations

Best actor nomination: "Bright Victory" (1951)

Best supporting actor nominations: "Champion" (1949), "Trial" (1955), "Peyton Place" (1957), "Some Came Running" (1958)



Albert Finney — 5 nominations

Best actor nominations: "Tom Jones" (1963), "Murder on the Orient Express" (1974), "The Dresser" (1983), "Under the Volcano" (1984)

Best supporting actor nomination:"Erin Brockovich" (2000)



Irene Dunne — 5 nominations

Best actress nominations: "Cimarron" (1931), "Theodora Goes Wild" (1936), "The Awful Truth" (1937), "Love Affair" (1939), "I Remember Mama" (1948)



Amy Adams — 6 nominations

Best actress nomination:"American Hustle" (2013)

Best supporting actress nominations:"Junebug" (2005), "Doubt" (2008), "The Fighter" (2010), "The Master" (2012), "Vice" (2018)



Thelma Ritter — 6 nominations

Best supporting actress nominations: "All About Eve" (1950), "The Mating Season" (1951), "With a Song in My Heart" (1952), "Pickup on South Street" (1953), "Pillow Talk" (1959), "Birdman of Alcatraz" (1962)



Deborah Kerr — 6 nominations

Best actress nominations: "Edward, My Son" (1949), "From Here to Eternity" (1953), "The King and I" (1956), "Heaven Knows, Mr Allison" (1957), "Separate Tables" (1958), "The Sundowners" (1960)

Kerr received the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement in 1994. 



Richard Burton — 7 nominations

Best actor nominations: "The Robe" (1954), "Becket" (1964), "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold" (1965), "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), "Anne of the Thousand Days" (1969), "Equus" (1977)

Best supporting actor nomination: "My Cousin Rachel" (1952)



Glenn Close — 8 nominations

Best actress nominations:"Fatal Attraction" (1987), "Dangerous Liaisons" (1988), "Albert Nobbs" (2011), "The Wife" (2018)

Best supporting actress nominations:"The World According to Garp" (1982), "The Big Chill" (1983), "The Natural" (1984), "Hillbilly Elegy" (2020)



Peter O'Toole — 8 nominations

Best actor nominations: "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962), "Becket" (1964), "The Lion in Winter" (1968), "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" (1969), "The Ruling Class "(1972), "The Stunt Man" (1980), "My Favorite Year" (1982), "Venus" (2006)

O'Toole received the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement in 2002. 



Disney will stream new 'Spider-Man' movies and other Sony franchises after they leave Netflix

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spider man far from home sony

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Netflix isn't the only streaming giant that Sony is striking deals with.

Sony and Disney announced on Wednesday that Disney had landed the US streaming and TV rights to new Sony theatrical releases beginning in 2022 until 2026.

The deal means that Disney will be able to stream new Sony theatrical releases on Disney Plus and Hulu, and air them on its linear networks like ABC and FX, but only after the movies complete their theatrical, home-entertainment, and Netflix runs.

The agreement also gives Disney the rights to Sony library titles that include franchises like "Spider-Man,"  "Jumanji," and "Hotel Transylvania." 

Netflix and Sony announced their own five-year licensing deal earlier this month. Netflix will stream new Sony movies beginning next year after they complete their theatrical and home-entertainment runs. Then they'll go to Disney after the pay-one TV window with Netflix expires, which is typically after 18 months.

Sony's 2022 theatrical slate includes "Morbius," about a vampire who is a frequent Spider-Man villain in the comics; "Uncharted," based on the hit video-game series; and a "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" sequel. The studio is expected to make "Jumanji" and "Bad Boys" sequels in the future, as well.

Sony owns the movie rights to Spider-Man and 900 related Marvel characters. Disney, which owns Marvel, and Sony struck a deal in 2019 for Spider-Man to star in one more Marvel Cinematic Universe solo movie and appear in another MCU film. That solo movie, "Spider-Man: No Way Home," hits theaters in December.

The "Spider-Man" movies aren't currently streaming on Disney Plus, but this new agreement between Sony and Disney means that could change. Disney noted in its announcement on Wednesday that Hulu will have access to a  "significant number" of library titles beginning as early as June.

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A new startup has raised $12 million to make pay-per-view movies with YouTubers, TikTok stars, and other creators

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Creator Plus cofounders Jonathan Shambroom and Benjamin Grubbs.

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YouTube creators are becoming boxers and podcast hosts. Is movie stardom next? 

A new film and streaming upstart called Creator+ has raised $12 million to produce long-form movies starring influencers. 

The startup, cofounded by Next 10 Ventures' Benjamin Grubbs and the investor Jonathan Shambroom, says it will produce six feature films this year. The movies will air on a new streaming platform the company created starting in 2022.

To watch a film, users pay per view rather than shelling out for a monthly subscription fee for access. The company said the price for a film rental would be roughly the cost of a movie ticket and creators would get a cut of any sales generated. It plans to spend low-seven-figure budgets on each project.

"A transactional model allows us with each creator and each project to have that be a meaningful business opportunity for the creator where there's accountability, the economics are specific to that project, and that creator and the company both benefit," Shambroom said. "There's a mind-dizzying array of subscription choices out there for people today, and we saw the opportunity to do something different."

Creator+ isn't the only company scouting social-media influencers for movies. Miramax and Netflix cast the TikTok creator Addison Rae Easterling to star in its "She's All That" remake, "He's All That." Mark Wahlberg's Unrealistic Ideas colaunched a content studio focused on digital creators with the TikTok star Josh Richards. And digital-native startups like Brat, Amp Studios, and Superplastic are similarly looking for ways to move digital talent onto other screens.

It's also not the first startup to raise funding to launch a streaming platform for digital creators. Jason Kilar, WarnerMedia's CEO, raised $75 million in 2014 to lure content creators over to a video subscription service called Vessel. And Fullscreen Media launched a Netflix-style subscription service in 2016. Both services shut down within a couple years.

But unlike its predecessors, Creator+ is offering its films for rental rather than charging a monthly subscription.

"We don't have the burden of supporting a subscription model," Shambroom said. "For a subscription offer to work as a value proposition, you need a massive catalog of choice, and that comes with cost structure."

He added: "We're able to now work directly with creators of our choosing and incrementally roll out projects and have each one of them be profitable and then share that with the creator."

Other influencer upstarts have tested out pay-per-view models this year. Triller Fight Club, an on-demand platform that airs boxing matches between internet stars and traditional fighters, charged $50 for viewers to tune in to its most recent streaming event. Grubbs said internet users were well-practiced in paying for individual items to support creators they admire, whether that means buying a MrBeast Burger or purchasing a pair of sweatpants featuring an influencer's catchphrase.

"We've seen demonstration of that, again, through merchandise, consumer products, and consumers' willingness to actually pay out on a per-transaction basis," he said.

The company's $12 million financing round was led by Petra Group and Freestyle Capital, which also invested in the creator subscription platform Patreon. Other participating investors include Jake Roper, a producer behind the YouTube network Vsauce, the YouTuber Wendy Ayche, and the music artist and YouTube creator Peter Hollens. 

Creator+ has hired Adam Wescott from Select Management Group to serve as the head of its content studio, Nick Phillips to head up production, McKenna Marshall to lead development, and Twitch's Tricia Choi to be its head of product. Wescott, Phillips, and Marshall will serve as producers on all projects. Ben O'Keefe is joining Creator+ as its head of diversity and impact, a focus area for the company as it looks to recruit a diverse roster of talent for its films.

"Our intention is that the movies that we're going to be working on and bringing to the market, we want to be perceived and stand up to any other movie that is being released today," Grubbs said.

And while Creator+'s low-seven-figure production budgets are small when compared with film projects by bigger Hollywood players, the company said its digital talent was used to working scrappily. 

Shambroom said creators "are accustomed to being incredibly resourceful in producing their short-form content."

"We won't be doing any helicopter chase scenes — that's for sure," he added.

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All 92 Oscar best-picture winners, ranked from worst to best by movie critics

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parasite

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It's been a turbulent year for the movie business, but the show must go on.

The 93rd Oscars ceremony is Sunday after being pushed back due to the coronavirus pandemic. And the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences also bent the rules a bit for this year's Oscars.

Movies that debuted on streaming services qualified as long as they had a planned theatrical release (a movie usually has to have a qualifying theatrical run). And movies released between January 1, 2020 and February 28, 2021 qualified (it's usually only the calendar year). 

The delay meant that last year's best picture winner, "Parasite," was the reigning champion for a bit longer. It broke barriers as the first international feature to win the Oscars' top prize. 

This year's frontrunner is "Nomadland," directed by Chloé Zhao and starring Frances McDormand. Seven other films are also competing for cinema's most prestigious award, including Netflix's "The Trial of the Chicago 7" and "Mank."

Business Insider ranked all 92 best picture winners — from the first winner, "Wings," in 1927 to "Parasite"— based on their critic score on the reviews-aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes.

In the case of ties, we broke them based on their audience scores on the site. (And if those were the same, the film with more critic reviews came out on top.) 

All 92 best picture Oscar winners are ranked below:

SEE ALSO: The 50 best movies of all time, according to critics

92. "The Broadway Melody" (1929)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 33%



91. "The Greatest Show on Earth" (1952)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 47%



90. "Cimarron" (1931)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 52%



89. "Out of Africa" (1985)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 62%



88. "Cavalcade" (1933)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 64%

User score: 26%



87. "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 64%

User score: 50%



86. "Around the World in 80 Days" (1956)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 69%



85. "Forrest Gump" (1994)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 71%



84. "Crash" (2004)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 74%

Audience score: 88%



83. "A Beautiful Mind" (2001)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 74%

Audience score: 93%



82. "Gentleman's Agreement" (1947)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 76%

Audience score: 78%

 



81. "Gladiator" (2000)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 77%

Audience score: 87%



80. "Terms of Endearment" (1983)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 78%

Audience score: 83%



79. "Braveheart" (1995)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 78%

Audience score: 85%



78. "Green Book" (2018)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 78%

Audience score: 91% 



77. "Going My Way" (1944)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 81% (31 reviews) 

Audience score: 74%



76. "Gigi" (1958)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 81% (37 reviews)

Audience score: 74%



75. "Tom Jones" (1963)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 82%

Audience score: 58%



74. "The Life of Emile Zola" (1937)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 82%

Audience score: 73% 



73. "Chariots of Fire" (1981)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 82%

Audience score: 80%



72. "Oliver!" (1968)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 82% (33 reviews)

Audience score: 81% 



71. "Driving Miss Daisy" (1989)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 82% (65 reviews)

Audience score: 81% 



70. "A Man For All Seasons" (1966)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 83% (42 reviews)

Audience score: 87% 



69. "Dances With Wolves" (1990)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 83% (76 reviews)

Audience score: 87% 



68. "The Sound of Music" (1965)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 83%

Audience score: 91%



67. "The English Patient" (1996)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 85%

Audience score: 83%



66. "Gandhi" (1982)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 85%

Audience score: 92%



65. "Grand Hotel" (1932)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 86%

Audience score: 77%



64. "Chicago" (2002)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 86%

Audience score: 83%

 



63. "Ben-Hur" (1959)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 86%

Audience score: 89%

 



62. "Platoon" (1986)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 87% (69 reviews)

Audience score: 93% 



61. "American Beauty" (1999)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 87% (190 reviews)

Audience score: 93% 



60. "Midnight Cowboy" (1969)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 88%

Audience score: 88% 



59. "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 88%

Audience score: 89%



58. "Titanic" (1997)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 89%

Audience score: 69%



57. "How Green Was My Valley" (1941)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 89%

Audience score: 81%



56. "Ordinary People" (1980)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 89% (54 reviews)

Audience score: 88% 



55. "The Last Emperor" (1987)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 89% (72 reviews)

Audience score: 88%



54. "Rain Man" (1988)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 89%

Audience score: 90%



53. "Million Dollar Baby" (2004)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 90%

Audience score: 90% 



52. "The Departed" (2006)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 90%

Audience score: 94%



51. "Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)" (2014)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 91%

Audience score: 77% 



50. "Slumdog Millionaire" (2008)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 91%

Audience score: 90% 



49. "Gone with the Wind" (1939)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 91%

Audience score: 92%



48. "Rocky" (1976)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92%

Audience score: 69%



47. "The Shape of Water" (2017)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92%

Audience score: 72%



46. "Shakespeare in Love" (1998)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92%

Audience score: 80%



45. "From Here to Eternity" (1953)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92% (61 reviews)

Audience score: 84%



44. "West Side Story" (1961)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92% (78 reviews)

Audience score: 84%



43. "The Deer Hunter" (1978)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92%

Audience score: 92% 



42. "Wings" (1927)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 79%



41. "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 84%



40. "Lord of the Rings: Return of the King" (2003)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93% (275 reviews)

Audience score: 86% 



39. "No Country for Old Men" (2007)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93% (288 reviews)

Audience score: 86%



38. "You Can't Take It With You" (1938)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 88%



37. "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 93% 



36. "The Apartment" (1960)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 94%



35. "Amadeus" (1984)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93%

Audience score: 95% 



34. "The King's Speech" (2010)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94%

Audience score: 92% 



33. "Patton" (1970)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94%

Audience score: 93% 



32. "The Sting" (1973)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94%

Audience score: 95% 



31. "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94%

Audience score: 96% 



30. "All the King's Men" (1949)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95%

Audience score: 78%



29. "Hamlet " (1948)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95%

Audience score: 80%



28. "Mrs. Miniver" (1942)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95%

Audience score: 85%



27. "The Artist" (2011)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95%

Audience score: 87%



26. "My Fair Lady" (1964)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95% (58 reviews)

Audience score: 90% 



25. "12 Years a Slave" (2013)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95% (371 reviews)

Audience score: 90% 



24. "In the Heat of the Night" (1967)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95% 

Audience score: 92%



23. "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 95%

Audience score: 93%



22. "An American in Paris" (1951)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 79%



21. "Argo" (2012)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 90% 



20. "Annie Hall" (1977)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 92%



19. "Unforgiven" (1992)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 93% 



18. "The Silence of the Lambs" (1991)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 95% 



17. "The Godfather Part II" (1974)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96%

Audience score: 97%



16. "The Hurt Locker" (2009)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 97%

Audience score: 84%



15. "Spotlight" (2015)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 97%

Audience score: 93%



14. "The Godfather" (1972)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 97%

Audience score: 98%



13. "Moonlight" (2016)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98%

Audience score: 79%



12 "Marty" (1955)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98% (42 reviews)

Audience score: 87%



11. "The French Connection" (1971)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98% (83 reviews)

Audience score: 87%



10. "All Quiet on the Western Front" (1930)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98%

Audience score: 89%



9. "The Lost Weekend" (1945)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98% (44 reviews)

Audience score: 90%



8. "Parasite" (2019)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98% (458 reviews)

Audience score: 90%



7. "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98% 

Audience score: 93%



6. "Schindler's List" (1993)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 98%

Audience score: 97% 



5. "It Happened One Night" (1934)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 99%

Audience score: 93%



4. "All About Eve" (1950)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 99%

Audience score: 94%



3. "On the Waterfront" (1954)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 99% (102 reviews)

Audience score: 95% 



2. "Casablanca" (1942)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 99% (122 reviews)

Audience score: 95% 



1. "Rebecca" (1940)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 100%



The 43 actors who have won multiple Oscars, ranked by who has won the most

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Renee Zellweger accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a leading role for

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Oscar wins are hard to come by, and those actors who have won multiple Academy Awards are an exclusive club.

Renée Zellweger joined the club last year when she won her second Oscar for her performance as Judy Garland in "Judy." Her first Oscar came 16 years ago for "Cold Mountain."

Zellweger still trails a list of actors and actresses with illustrious careers who have won more statues, including Meryl Streep, Jack Nicholson, and Katharine Hepburn.

Frances McDormand could join the three-Oscars club during this year's ceremony on Sunday if she wins for her performance in "Nomadland." 

Several other previous winners are also competing this year, including Viola Davis, Gary Oldman, Olivia Colman, and Anthony Hopkins, all of whom have won one Oscar.

John Lynch contributed to an earlier version of this post. 

Here are the 43 actors who have won multiple Academy Awards in acting categories:

SEE ALSO: The 23 actors who have gotten the most Oscar nominations without winning one

Renée Zellweger — 2 wins, 4 nominations

Best actress: "Judy" (2019)

Best supporting actress: "Cold Mountain" (2003)



Mahershala Ali — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best supporting actor: "Moonlight" (2016), "Green Book" (2018)



Christoph Waltz — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best supporting actor:"Inglorious Basterds" (2009), "Django Unchained" (2012)



Hilary Swank — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best actress:"Boys Don't Cry" (1999), "Million Dollar Baby" (2004)



Kevin Spacey — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best actor:"American Beauty" (1999)

Best supporting actor:"The Usual Suspects" (1995)



Luise Rainer — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best actress:"The Great Ziegfeld" (1936), "The Good Earth" (1937)



Vivien Leigh — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best actress:"Gone with the Wind" (1939), "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1951)



Helen Hayes — 2 wins, 2 nominations

Best actress: "The Sin of Madelon Claudet" (1931)

Best supporting actress: "Airport" (1970)



Dianne Wiest — 2 wins, 3 nominations

Best supporting actress:"Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986), "Bullets over Broadway" (1994)



Peter Ustinov — 2 wins, 3 nominations

Best supporting actor:"Spartacus" (1960), "Topkapi" (1964)



Jason Robards — 2 wins, 3 nominations

Best supporting actor:"All the President's Men" (1976), "Julia" (1977)



Sally Field — 2 wins, 3 nominations

Best actress:"Norma Rae" (1979), "Places in the Heart" (1984)



Melvyn Douglas — 2 wins, 3 nominations

Best supporting actor:"Hud" (1963), "Being There" (1979)



Shelley Winters — 2 wins, 4 nominations

Best supporting actress:"The Diary of Anne Frank" (1959), "A Patch of Blue" (1965)



Anthony Quinn — 2 wins, 4 nominations

Best supporting actor:"Viva Zapata!" (1952), "Lust for Life" (1956)



Glenda Jackson — 2 wins, 4 nominations

Best actress: "Women in Love" (1970), "A Touch of Class" (1973)



Jodie Foster — 2 wins, 4 nominations

Best actress:"The Accused" (1988), "The Silence of the Lambs" (1991)



Elizabeth Taylor — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actress: "Butterfield 8" (1960), "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966)



Sean Penn — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actor:"Mystic River" (2003), "Milk" (2008)



Frances McDormand — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actress:"Fargo" (1996), "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" (2017)



Fredric March — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actor:"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (1931), "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946)



Tom Hanks — 2 wins, 6 nominations

Best actor:"Philadelphia" (1993), "Forrest Gump" (1994)



Gene Hackman — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actor:"The French Connection" (1971)

Best supporting actor:"Unforgiven" (1992)



Olivia de Havilland — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actress: "To Each His Own" (1946), "The Heiress" (1949)



Gary Cooper — 2 wins, 5 nominations

Best actor:"Sergeant York" (1941), "High Noon" (1952)



Maggie Smith — 2 wins, 6 nominations

Best actress: "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" (1969)

Best supporting actress:"California Suite" (1978)



Jessica Lange — 2 wins, 6 nominations

Best actress:"Blue Sky" (1994)

Best supporting actress:"Tootsie" (1982)



Michael Caine — 2 wins, 6 nominations

Best supporting actor:"Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986), "The Cider House Rules" (1999)



Dustin Hoffman — 2 wins, 7 nominations

Best actor:"Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979), "Rain Man" (1988)



Jane Fonda — 2 wins, 7 nominations

Best actress:"Klute" (1971), "Coming Home" (1978)



Robert De Niro — 2 wins, 7 nominations

Best actor:"Raging Bull" (1980)

Best supporting actor:"The Godfather Part II" (1974)



Cate Blanchett — 2 wins, 7 nominations

Best actress:"Blue Jasmine" (2013)

Best supporting actress:"The Aviator" (2004)



Denzel Washington — 2 wins, 8 nominations

Best actor:"Training Day" (2001)

Best supporting actor:"Glory" (1989)



Jack Lemmon — 2 wins, 8 nominations

Best actor:"Save the Tiger" (1973)

Best supporting actor:"Mister Roberts" (1955)



Marlon Brando — 2 wins, 8 nominations

Best actor: "On the Waterfront" (1954), "The Godfather" (1972)



Spencer Tracy — 2 wins, 9 nominations

Best actor:"Captains Courageous" (1937), "Boys Town" (1938)



Bette Davis — 2 wins, 10 nominations

Best actress:"Dangerous" (1935), "Jezebel" (1938)



Walter Brennan — 3 wins, 4 nominations

Best supporting actor: "Come and Get It" (1936), "Kentucky" (1938), "The Westerner" (1940)



Ingrid Bergman — 3 wins, 7 nominations

Best actress:"Gaslight" (1944), "Anastasia" (1956)

Best supporting actress:"Murder on the Orient Express" (1974)



Jack Nicholson — 3 wins, 12 nominations

Best actor:"One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975), "As Good as It Gets" (1997)

Best supporting actor:"Terms of Endearment" (1983)



Meryl Streep — 3 wins, 21 nominations

Best actress:"Sophie's Choice" (1982), "The Iron Lady" (2011)

Best supporting actress:"Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979)



Daniel Day-Lewis — 3 wins, 6 nominations

Best actor: "My Left Foot" (1989), "There Will Be Blood" (2007), "Lincoln" (2012)



Katharine Hepburn — 4 wins, 12 nominations

Best actress: "Morning Glory" (1933), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967), "The Lion in Winter" (1968), "On Golden Pond" (1981)



The 93rd Academy Awards will honor the best films of the year — here's how to watch live on April 23

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The 93rd Academy Awards will recognize some of the best films from 2020 and early 2021. The ceremony will be broadcast on April 25 at 8 p.m. ET from Union Station in Los Angeles, while the night's performances will be held at the Dolby Theatre. You can watch the show live on ABC.

This year's event has already made history with its nominations. "Minari" actor Steven Yeun is the first Asian-American ever nominated for a best actor Oscar. "Nomadland" director Chloé Zhao is the first woman of color to receive an Oscar nomination for best director. Zhao joins "Promising Young Woman" director Emerald Fennell in the category, making this the first year two women are simultaneously nominated for the award. 

The 2021 Academy Awards will be the third Oscars ceremony in a row to be conducted without a host. The show will still loop in a number of celebrities to present categories, however, including Rita Moreno, Zendaya, Bryan Cranston, and Brad Pitt.

Unlike previous awards shows during the pandemic, most nominees will be attending the event in person rather than virtually, but venues will be set up in London and Paris for people outside the US. 

How to watch the 2021 Oscars

The 2021 Oscars will be held on April 25 at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. The show is expected to wrap up around 11 p.m. ET. Prior to the ceremony, a pre-show will start at 6:30 p.m. ET. 

You can watch the Oscars on ABC via cable, satellite, antenna, or any live streaming service with access to the channel. The show will also be streamed via ABC.com and the ABC app. That said, ABC's site and app both require you to sign in with an authenticated pay-TV provider. 

Live streaming services with ABC

To watch the 2021 Oscars without cable, you can use one of several live TV streaming services with access to ABC, including Hulu + Live TV, YouTube TV, and Fubo TV

All three services offer plans that start at $65 a month and include ABC in select markets. Hulu's website, FuboTV's website, and YouTube's website all let you check to see what channels are available in your area. 

Hulu + Live TV offers a total of around 65 channels, along with access to all of Hulu's on-demand movies and shows. YouTube TV features around 85 channels, and Fubo TV's base plan includes around 120 channels.

+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)

Another way to stream ABC is with Locast, a non-profit app that offers free local channels in 31 markets. Although the streaming service will let you watch the Oscars for free, you'll have to register for an account and donate at least $5 a month for uninterrupted viewing. Otherwise, a donation request will interrupt your streams every few minutes.

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What movies and performers are nominated for 2021 Oscars?

Eight movies are up for best picture this year, with Netflix's "Mank" receiving the most nominations (10) of any film at the ceremony.  

You can find a full list of 2021 Oscar nominations here, and we've compiled all the nominees in the four main categories below:

Best picture



Directing



Actress in a leading role



Actor in a leading role




The top 9 movies on Netflix this week, from 'Synchronic' to 'Rush'

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9. "Saving Private Ryan" (1998)

Description: "Eight U.S. Army Rangers penetrate German-held territory during World War II to find and bring home a soldier whose three brothers have been killed."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 93%

What critics said: "Saving Private Ryan is a masterpiece. It cements Steven Spielberg's reputation as one of the seminal filmmakers of the era."— Observer



8. "American Me" (1992)

Description: "Three friends born in poverty create their own capitalist dream as powerful gang members. Time in prison makes one of them consider a fresh beginning."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 78%

What critics said: "It knows these worlds. The language, the clothes, the attitudes, are all shown with the understated conviction of a director who is sure of his material."— Chicago Sun-Times



7. "Rush" (2013)

Description: "In the 1970s, a rivalry propels race car drivers Niki Lauda and James Hunt to fame and glory — until a horrible accident threatens to end it all."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 89%

What critics said: "Considering the subject matter, Rush delivers the expected visceral jolts; what's surprising is how endearing it is, even when its two protagonists are behaving like little more than boys with very fast toys."— Washington Post



6. "The Zookeeper's Wife" (2017)

Description: "When the Nazis invade Poland, Warsaw Zoo caretakers work with the underground resistance to save Jews from the horrors of the Third Reich."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 64%

What critics said: "A compelling story bolstered by engaging performances from Jessica Chastain and Daniel Brühl, let down by occasional awkward tonal shifts and clumsy plotting."— Empire Magazine



5. "Barbie and Chelsea: The Lost Birthday" (2021)

Description: "When Barbie's sister Chelsea thinks her birthday has been skipped, she hunts for a magic gem on a jungle island that will grant her wish to get it back."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A

What critics said: N/A



4. "The Little Rascals" (1994)

Description: "As Alfalfa tries to charm Darla, a group of pint-sized mischief-makers land in all sorts of antics. Inspired by Hal Roach's 'Our Gang' series."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 23%

What critics said: "I have more and more respect for director Spheeris (Beverly Hillbillies, Wayne's World), not because she makes incredible movies, but because she takes the shlockiest of Tinseltown's ideas for films and finds ways to have fun with them."— Austin Chronicle



3. "Why Did You Kill Me?" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "The line between justice and revenge blurs when a devastated family uses social media to track down the people who killed 24-year-old Crystal Theobald."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 67%

What critics said: "Just because a crime is true doesn't mean it's interesting. And as 'Why Did You Kill Me?' makes clear, without substance, a dash of style won't do."— New York Times



2. "Thunder Force" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "Two childhood best friends reunite as an unlikely crime-fighting superhero duo when one invents a formula that gives ordinary people superpowers."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 23%

What critics said: "Through too much of Thunder Force, McCarthy makes do with dialogue and situations that are serviceable at best."— Time



1. "Synchronic" (2020)

Description: "Two paramedics begin to question their realities after coming across several bizarre deaths linked to a new narcotic with mind-bending effects."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 79%

What critics said: "The movie makes superb use of New Orleans as a a city that hums with hauntings and harrowing history. Synchronic isn't a home run, but a decent time travel triple is always welcome."— IGN



'The Father' starring Anthony Hopkins is nominated for best picture at the 2021 Oscars, and you can stream it at home right now

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"The Father" is now available to rent through video-on-demand (VOD) services for $20. The drama is up for best picture at the 2021 Academy Awards.

"The Father" follows an elderly man, Anthony (Anthony Hopkins), who is dealing with dementia. The movie also stars Golden Globe-winning actress Olivia Colman as Anthony's daughter Anne. The film is based on Florian Zeller's play of the same name, and marks Zeller's feature-length directorial debut. 

You can rent "The Father" through a variety of digital retailers just in time for the Academy Awards this weekend. The film's six Oscar nominations include nods for best picture, best actor (Hopkins), best supporting actress (Colman), best adapted screenplay (Zeller and Christopher Hampton), best film editing, and best production design.

In addition to two wins at the 2021 British Academy Film Awards, "The Father" also received four nominations at the Golden Globes and two nominations at the Screen Actors Guild Awards. 

How to watch 'The Father'

"The Father" is available to rent through a number of VOD streaming retailers, including Amazon Prime Video,Apple TVVudu, Google Play, Microsoft, FandangoNow, and AMC

The movie costs $20 to rent and it's also available to watch at select theaters nationwide.

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VOD rental services offer the film in a number of formats including 4K with HDR,  high definition (HD), and standard definition (SD). Before you select a 4K format, you should check to see if your device supports it.

Most VOD rental services will give you 30 days to start watching a film after you rent it. Once you start the movie, you typically get 48 hours to complete it before your rental expires.

What other 2021 best picture nominees are available to watch?

Aside from "The Father," a number of other 2021 best picture nominees are available through VOD rental services. These films include "Minari,""Promising Young Woman," and "Judas and the Black Messiah."

Other films are available on subscription streaming services, including "Nomadland" on Hulu. "The Trial of the Chicago 7" and "Mank" are exclusive to Netflix. "Sound of Metal," starring Riz Ahmed, is streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

You can see a full list of 2021 Oscar nominations here. The Academy Awards will air on April 25 at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.

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Netflix won the most Oscars this year of any studio, but still lost best picture to Disney

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Viola Davis Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

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Netflix always manages to be an awards champion without winning the top award.

The streaming giant took home seven Oscars on Sunday, the most of any studio. But since it broke through the best-picture race with 2018's "Roma," it hasn't been able to actually win Hollywood's most coveted prize.

This year's best picture went to Searchlight's "Nomadland," which also won best director for Chloé Zhao (the second woman and the first woman of color to win the award) and best actress for Frances McDormand, her third win the category. Disney acquired the studio Searchlight, known for small-budget dramas, in its Fox merger.

Netflix led the Oscar nominations for the second year in a row with 35 heading into Sunday night's ceremony. Its David Fincher-directed film "Mank" landed the most nominations of any film with 10. 

But Netflix ultimately lost out on not only best picture, but all of the major categories in acting, directing, and screenplay. One of its best-picture contenders, "The Trial of the Chicago 7," didn't win any awards.

Here's what Netflix did win:

  • Documentary feature ("My Octopus Teacher")
  • Animated short ("If Anything Happens I Love You")
  • Live-action short ("Two Distant Strangers")
  • Cinematography and production design ("Mank")
  • Makeup/hairstyling and costume design ("Ma Rainey's Black Bottom")

Netflix has similarly dominated the Emmys nominations recently. It surpassed HBO for most nominations in two of the last three years, but didn't win best drama, comedy, or limited series. Its luck could change this year though with momentum behind "The Crown" and the limited series "The Queen's Gambit."

But while best picture has eluded Netflix, the Oscars have opened up to streaming in recent years, which is good news for the company's future in the awards race. And as media companies like Disney and WarnerMedia reorganize around their streaming businesses, the Oscars will likely continue to embrace the streaming space.

Here's how the Oscar wins broke down by studio:

  • Netflix: 7
  • Disney: 5
  • Warner Bros.: 3
  • Amazon Studios: 2
  • Sony Pictures Classics: 2
  • Focus Features: 1
  • A24: 1

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How to watch 'Nomadland' — the Oscar winner for best picture is now streaming on Hulu

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One of the top winners at the 2021 Academy Awards was "Nomadland." If you haven't seen the film yet, Hulu is here to help. "Nomadland" premiered in theaters and on Hulu simultaneously on February 19. The movie is also available to buy through video-on-demand services like Prime Video.

The film is based on the book "Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century." The story centers on a woman, Fern (Frances McDormand), who loses her job due to the recession. As she searches for work on the road in her van, Fern hears stories from other nomads in the American West. The film features supporting actors who are nomads in real life, including Bob Wells, known for his YouTube channel CheapRVliving.

"Nomadland" is directed by Chloé Zhao, who won best director at the 2021 Academy Awards. Zhao's win made her the first woman of color and second woman ever to win the Oscar for best directing. Her next film will be Marvel's superhero movie "Eternals" starring Angelina Jolie, Richard Madden, and Kumail Nanjiani.

Aside from Zhao's win, the film also took home the 2021 Oscar for best picture, and McDormand won best actress for her role as Fern. "Nomadland" has a "94% Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and Insider critic Jacob Sarkisian gave the movie an "A-" grade in his full review.

How to watch 'Nomadland' on Hulu

"Nomadland" is now available to stream on Hulu. The movie premiered on February 19. You can get access to Hulu for $6 a month with its basic, ad-supported plan

Aside from the monthly payment option, you can buy an entire year of Hulu for $60. That's $12 cheaper than the cost of paying for a year on a monthly basis. If you're not a fan of ads, Hulu also has an ad-free option for $12 a month.

You can watch "Nomadland" through Hulu on a number of streaming devices, including iOS and Android products, Apple TV, Chromecast, Amazon Fire TV, Nintendo Switch, Roku, PlayStation, Xbox, web browsers, and most smart TVs.

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For access to even more streaming content, we recommend you take advantage of the Disney bundle that includes Hulu Basic, ESPN+, and Disney Plus for $14 a month. With this bundle, you'll get access to two more 2021 Oscar-nominated movies via Disney Plus: "Soul" and "Onward."

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How to watch 'Nomadland' without Hulu

"Nomadland" is also available to buy through popular VOD streaming services for a one-time payment rather than a subscription fee. These services include Amazon Prime Video, Vudu, Apple TVGoogle Play, Redbox, Microsoft, and FandangoNow.

You can purchase the film for $15. The movie will be available to rent starting April 27. These services let you watch "Nomadland" in up to 4K with HDR. 

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What other Oscar-winning films can I watch?

Aside from "Nomadland," there are several other Oscar-winning films available to watch at home through VOD platforms and streaming services.

This includes titles like "Mank" on Netflix," and "Sound of Metal" on Amazon Prime Video. Meanwhile, you can rent "Promising Young Woman,""The Father," and "Minari" through digital rental services like Vudu. 

You can find a full list of 2021 Oscar winners here.

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'Promising Young Woman' is now available to rent or buy — here's how to watch the Oscar-winning movie at home

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Oscar-winning film "Promising Young Woman" is now streaming through a variety of digital services. The thriller is the directorial debut of Emerald Fennell, whose previous writing credits include several episodes of "Killing Eve." Digital purchases cost $20, while rentals are priced at $6. 

The film tells the story of Cassandra Thomas (Carey Mulligan), a young woman who seizes the opportunity to take revenge on a group of men responsible for a traumatic event in her past. Fennell's smart script infuses the thriller with elements of dark comedy. It earned Fennell the 2021 Academy Award for best original screenplay. The movie also stars comedian Bo Burnham as Mulligan's love interest, along with Laverne Cox ("Orange is the New Black"), Clancy Brown ("Highlander"), and Alison Brie ("Glow"). 

The film received five 2021 Oscar nominations, including best picture, best original screenplay, best directing (Fennell), best actress in a leading role (Mulligan), and best film editing. "Promising Young Woman" was also nominated — but lost — in four categories at this year's Golden Globes. Fennell was among two other female filmmakers nominated for best director. It was the most nominations for female directors in the Golden Globes' history.

"Promising Young Woman" currently holds a "91% Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes. If you want to see what has critics and audiences talking, you can rent or buy the movie right now.

How to watch 'Promising Young Woman'

"Promising Young Woman" premiered on streaming services on January 15. The movie is available to buy and rent through a number of video-on-demand (VOD) platforms.

You can buy "Promising Young Woman" for $20 on Amazon Prime Video, Vudu, FandangoNow, RedBox, Apple TV, Google Play, and Microsoft. You can also choose to rent the film for $6 instead of purchasing it.

Most platforms will allow you to rent the movie for a 30-day period but, after you start the film, you only have 48 hours to finish it. The movie is available in a number of formats, including 4K Ultra HD with HDR, high definition (HD), or standard definition (SD). 

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Digital rental services are available on a variety of media devices and smart TVs. You can find more information about how to rent movies online here

You can also buy "Promising Young Woman" on Blu-ray for $25 on Amazon, which is just $5 more than the cost to buy the streaming copy. 

What other Oscar-nominated films can I watch?

Aside from "Promising Young Woman," a number of other Oscar-winning movies are available to watch at home through VOD providers. These films include "Minari,""Nomadland, "The Father," and "Judas and the Black Messiah."

"Nomadland," winner of the 2021 Academy Award for best picture, was released on Hulu on February 19, the same day the movie premiered in theaters.

Meanwhile, if you want to watch the music-centric film "Sound of Metal," a two-time winner at the 2021 Academy Awards, you can stream it exclusively through Prime Video

You can also watch Oscar-winning film "Mank" and six-time Oscar-nominated film "The Trial of the Chicago 7" on Netflix

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16 Hollywood stars who didn't accept their Oscars or boycotted the ceremony

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The Oscars are the most celebrated awards show in Hollywood and a star-studded night to celebrate film. The Oscars, voted on by nearly 10,000 members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, have driven the conversation around the movie industry for more than nine decades. 

But that doesn't mean that everyone wants to go, or even be in the running to win one.

In the 93-year history of the ceremony, some of Hollywood's finest — from Marlon Brando to Will Smith — haven't been there to accept their awards or nominations, and some of those nominated have refused to attend out of protest. 

Anthony Hopkins won his second Oscar on Sunday, becoming the oldest person to win an acting Oscar at 83 years old. But he wasn't in attendance to accept the award.

This year's ceremony was a stripped-down version due to the pandemic, but the producers still didn't want actors to video into the ceremony from their homes. Instead, there were designated hubs in London, Paris, and more locations. But Hopkins had "no desire" to travel to them from his home in Wales, his representatives confirmed to Indiewire.

So, when this year's Oscars switched things up and ended the show on best actor (instead of best picture) in seeming anticipation for the late Chadwick Boseman to win the prize, Hopkins wasn't able to give a speech. He posted a brief one to his Instagram the next morning, thanking the Academy and paying tribute to Boseman.

Insider has rounded up 16 actors and creators who didn't accept the Oscars they won, and others who did not attend but were nominated. 

Carrie Wittmer contributed to an earlier version of this post.

SEE ALSO: A new documentary tells the history of the real Green Book, but the director doesn't support the Oscar-nominated movie

Anthony Hopkins

Hopkins wasn't in attendance at this year's Oscars and couldn't video into the ceremony from home due to the Oscars rules this year. He had no desire to travel to a designated hub near his home in Wales, according to Indiewire, so when he won the best actor Oscar on Sunday, he couldn't give an acceptance speech.

He posted a video to his Instagram Monday morning, thanking the Academy and paying tribute to the late Chadwick Boseman, who was the favorite among many industry watchers to win the award.

 



Kendrick Lamar

Lamar's "Black Panther" song, "All the Stars" (which he performed with Sia), was nominated for best original song at the 2019 Oscars, but the rapper did not attend the ceremony due to scheduling issues. The song was the only nominated song to not be performed.



Will Smith

In 2016, although not nominated for "Concussion," Will Smith vowed not to attend the Oscars in protest of a lack of diversity. For the second year in a row, all 20 acting nominees were white. Smith told "Good Morning America,""We're part of this community. But at this current time, we're uncomfortable to stand there and say, 'This is okay.'"

This wasn't Smith's first awards boycott: In 1989, he boycotted the Grammys when he learned that the announcement for best rap performance wouldn't be televised. 



Banksy

The mysterious British graffiti artist values his anonymity. In 2011 his debut film "Exit Through the Gift Shop" was nominated for best documentary. But Bansky was told he couldn't attend the ceremony in a mask. 

Academy executive Bruce Davis told Entertainment Weekly, "The fun but disquieting scenario is that if the film wins and five guys in monkey masks come to the stage all saying, 'I'm Banksy,' who the hell do we give it to?" Turns out it wouldn't have been a problem, since the film lost to "Inside Job."

 



Roman Polanski

The director didn't attend the 2003 ceremony that awarded him a statue for best director for his work on "The Pianist." But even if he tried, he likely wouldn't have made it, since he is still a fugitive in the US after a conviction for unlawful sex. Harrison Ford accepted the award on his behalf.



Eminem

When Eminem won best original song for "Lose Yourself" in 2003, he wasn't there to accept it. His cowriter Luis Resto accepted the award. Eminem was reportedly sleeping when his song won. In an interview, he said that he skipped the ceremony because he didn't think he had a chance. He probably thought Bono would win. And Bono probably thought he would win, too.



Terrence Malick

The legendary director has never attended the Oscars. Before "The Thin Red Line" came out, the producers of the film gave a revealing interview to Vanity Fair with details about working with Malick, despite signing a confidentiality agreement before shooting.

Malick got his first best director nomination for the movie, but didn't attend the ceremony because the producers who betrayed him were set to attend. They didn't show, but "The Thin Red Line" didn't win anything. Malick also wasn't at the 2012 ceremony, where he was nominated but didn't win for "The Tree of Life."

 



Michael Caine

Michael Caine wasn't around to accept his first Oscar win in 1987 for best supporting actor in "Hannah and Her Sisters," because he was busy filming "Jaws: The Revenge," a movie with a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Caine learned his lesson, and showed up in 2000 to accept his deserved win for a supporting role in "The Cider House Rules."

 



Paul Newman

After six acting nominations and two honorary Oscars, Newman finally got a win for "The Color of Money" in 1987. But he wasn't there to accept it, telling the Associated Press, "It's like chasing a beautiful woman for 80 years. Finally, she relents, and you say, 'I'm terribly sorry. I'm tired.'"

 



Woody Allen

The writer and filmmaker never attends award ceremonies — not even the 1978 Oscars when he won best actor, best original screenplay, and best picture for "Annie Hall." But he did attend the ceremony in 2002 to introduce films that had been made in New York to honor the city following the September 11 attacks.

Allen has said, "The whole concept of awards is silly. I cannot abide by the judgment of other people, because if you accept it when they say you deserve an award, then you have to accept it when they say you don't."



Katharine Hepburn

With four wins, Hepburn still holds the record for the most Oscars for any actor. Hepburn never showed up to the ceremonies to accept any of her Oscars on stage, though she didn't reject the awards themselves. Hepburn made her first appearance at the 1974 Academy Awards when she presented the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, saying, "I'm living proof that a person can wait 41 years to be unselfish."

 



Marlon Brando

Knowing he was a shoe-in to win best actor for his role as Vito Corleone in "The Godfather," Brando boycotted the Oscars in 1973. In his place, he had Native American activist Sacheen Littlefeather attend. She went onstage to accept his award, and when she read Brando's speech about the mistreatment of Native Americans in film, she got booed.

 

 

 

 



George C. Scott

Scott declined his best actor nomination for "Patton" in 1970, and had the decency to let the Academy know that he would refuse the award if he won. He won anyway, and reportedly called the Oscars a "two-hour meat parade." Today, the actor would be irate that the "meat parade" often exceeds four hours.



Stanley Kubrick

Kubrick famously never won an Oscar for best director. But in 1969, he won best visual effects for "2001: A Space Odyssey." Kubrick wasn't there, so Diahann Carroll and Burt Lancaster accepted the award on his behalf, joking that Kubrick was on Mars scouting locations for a sequel.



Elizabeth Taylor

Taylor's then-husband Richard Burton (also nominated for the same film "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?") convinced the actress to skip the 1966 ceremony with him. Burton had already lost four times, and was afraid of losing. Taylor won best actress.



Alice Brady

Brady — not to be confused with Alice from "The Brady Bunch"— won best supporting actress for her role in "In Old Chicago" at the 1938 ceremony. Since Brady wasn't there, a man came on stage and accepted the plaque on her behalf (supporting actors didn't get a statue until 1944). Turns out the man was an impostor, and actually stole the plaque. He was never found and neither was the plaque, but the Academy gave Brady a replacement. 

 



The top 9 movies on Netflix this week, from 'Stowaway' to 'Thunder Force'

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9. "Saving Private Ryan" (1998)

Description: "Eight U.S. Army Rangers penetrate German-held territory during World War II to find and bring home a soldier whose three brothers have been killed."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 93%

What critics said: "[Saving Private Ryan] accomplishes something I had been taught was most difficult — making an action-filled anti-war film or, at least, one that doesn't in some way glorify or lie about combat."— Chicago Tribune



8. "Barbie and Chelsea: The Lost Birthday" (2021)

Description: "When Barbie's sister Chelsea thinks her birthday has been skipped, she hunts for a magic gem on a jungle island that will grant her wish to get it back."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A

What critics said: N/A



7. "The Zookeeper's Wife" (2017)

Description: "When the Nazis invade Poland, Warsaw Zoo caretakers work with the underground resistance to save Jews from the horrors of the Third Reich."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 64%

What critics said: "Jessica Chastain is relaxed with some actual lion cubs, and there's a bunny that should win an Oscar. But when the film pivots to the scared human beings down below, you get a hint of the weirder, tougher drama it might have been."— Time Out



6. "The Secret Life of Pets 2" (2019)

Description: "On a farm outside New York, Max aims to boost his confidence while in the city, Snowball attempts to rescue a tiger cub and Gidget pretends to be a cat."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 60%

What critics said: "It's never a great sign when the biggest laughs a movie gets are during the end credits."— New York Post



5. "The Little Rascals" (1994)

Description: "As Alfalfa tries to charm Darla, a group of pint-sized mischief-makers land in all sorts of antics. Inspired by Hal Roach's 'Our Gang' series."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 23%

What critics said: "Spheeris appears caught between her desire to make a film for little children and amuse their parents, resulting in a mess that will do anything for a cheap laugh."— Blu-ray.com



4. "Synchronic" (2020)

Description: "Two paramedics begin to question their realities after coming across several bizarre deaths linked to a new narcotic with mind-bending effects."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 79%

What critics said: "A smart indie sci-fi which has much to say and some great ideas, all wrapped up in a designer-drug-based premise that makes it sound less interesting than it actually is."— Empire Magazine



3. "Thunder Force" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "Two childhood best friends reunite as an unlikely crime-fighting superhero duo when one invents a formula that gives ordinary people superpowers."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 22%

What critics said: "Thunder Force might help illustrate why there are so few pure superhero comedy movies ... It's almost as if being a superhero is hard, but being funny is much harder."  — Polygon



2. "American Me" (1992)

Description: "Three friends born in poverty create their own capitalist dream as powerful gang members. Time in prison makes one of them consider a fresh beginning."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 78%

What critics said: "Throughout, Olmos dominates the film with an impassive, yet inwardly tormented performance as he wears the implacable mask of power."— Hartford Courant



1. "Stowaway" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "A three-person crew on a mission to Mars faces an impossible choice when an unplanned passenger jeopardizes the lives of everyone on board."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 75%

What critics said: "Just about every confusing plot point is overcome by a powerful human moment."— Vulture




Pixar staffers fear Disney won't release their movies in theaters even post-pandemic as the company bets its future on streaming

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When it comes to a movie-theater experience, the Steve Jobs Theater on Pixar Animation Studios' campus in Emeryville, California, is one of the most special.

Sitting in one of the theater's comfy red velvet seats and catching a glance at the twinkly lights on the ceiling that animates into a shooting star as the house lights go down, one can't help being in a good mood before watching Pixar's latest creation.

Now, less than two months before the release date for "Luca," the newest release from Disney's famed animation house that centers on two boys who are really sea monsters, the theater named after the legendary Pixar chairman should be in heavy use. The film's director, Enrico Casarosa, and the company's brain trust — made up of its chief creative officer, Pete Docter; its president, Jim Morris; and other top executives — should be in there constantly watching the latest cuts of the movie as they prepare to sign off on another Pixar release.

But none of that is happening.

The pandemic has closed the once vibrant Pixar campus. In fact, no one in the US has seen a new Pixar movie in a movie theater in over a year. Movie theaters have largely been closed for months, leading to a previously unthinkable reality: new releases being made instantly available on streaming services and premium video on demand.

There are signs of normality, however, on the horizon. An actual summer movie season is happening as more and more theaters reopen. Now titles like "F9,""Black Widow" (which will also be available on Disney Plus), "Jungle Cruise," and "The Suicide Squad" (also available on HBO Max) are scheduled for summer releases.

But, surprisingly, there will be no Pixar movies in theaters. In late March, Disney announced that "Luca" would be released only on Disney Plus. This comes on the heels of Docter's "Soul" being released exclusively on the streamer in December.

Several Pixar sources told Insider that frustration was building within the company as staff members saw their work appearing only on Disney Plus. They agreed to speak on the condition of anonymity, as they are not authorized to speak publicly.

"'Luca' doesn't even have a premium price next to it," one staffer told Insider recently in bewilderment, referring to the added cost subscribers have to pay to see new releases on the service. "Does it make it lesser? It's hard to grasp."

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'Soul' director Pete Docter was disappointed his Oscar-winning movie didn't get a theatrical run

Pixar's release strategy seemed to change practically overnight.

With most theaters shutting down because of the pandemic at the beginning of March 2020, Pixar's "Onward" found itself in limbo with nowhere to be shown after a theater run of just two weeks. It resulted in the movie, following two elf brothers looking to bring back their late father, becoming one of the first to break the traditional 90-day exclusive theatrical window major movies abide by as it was then made available for digital release. Soon after it was available on Disney Plus.

A month later, Disney announced it was moving Pixar's next release (and latest Oscar winner), "Soul," from June 19 to November 20 with the hope that theaters would reopen by then. But in October, news came of another release-date change and that Disney was not going to release "Soul," centered on an aspiring jazz musician whose life was cut short, in theaters. It would become the first Pixar movie in its 26-year history to not open on the big screen. Instead, it was given an exclusive Disney Plus release on Christmas Day.

pixar soul joe gardnerThe news disappointed Docter, according to several sources with knowledge of the situation. But the frustration was softened by the fact that Disney was ecstatic by how well the movie performed on Disney Plus.

"That's what was so eye-opening — Disney was over the moon about the numbers," one staffer familiar with the "Soul" release said.

Pixar and Disney did not respond to numerous inquiries for a comment.

Most at Pixar agreed with the choice to put "Soul" on the streamer. But the hope at the company, according to several sources, was this was all an aberration — that the film, featuring the first Black lead character in a Pixar movie, would be the first and last time a movie from the studio would not open in theaters.

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Kneecapped theaters need Pixar movies to remain afloat

As states began to gradually allow theaters to reopen late last year with limited capacities, it was family movies that enticed moviegoers to return.

DreamWorks' "The Croods: A New Age," Warner Bros.' "Tom and Jerry," and Disney Animation's "Raya and the Last Dragon" all topped the domestic box office for their opening weekends in theaters, with "Croods" and "Raya" retaining the No. 1 spot for more than one weekend.

With more theaters reopening as vaccinations ramp up, theater owners have been licking their chops to put "Luca" on their marquees, as Pixar titles have historically brought families and adults alike in droves. The decision to release the film solely on Disney Plus came as a gut punch for an industry struggling to stay afloat.

"When that news came out with Disney's reshuffling of its 'Luca' release, it was very disappointing and very discouraging," Russell Vannorsdel, the vice president of the Iowa-based Fridley Theatres, told Insider. "It's pretty clear the handwriting is on the wall that we will not be going back to normal, particularly with Disney."

Fridley Theatres, with 18 locations in the Midwest, is just one of many mid-market chains that are desperate not just for new releases but for family fare such as Disney and Pixar titles.

"'Soul' not showing in theaters had some levels of justification," Vannorsdel said. "It was Christmas. They wanted to promote Disney Plus. People were still very hesitant to go to movie theaters."

"'Luca' was scheduled for the summer and could have had an amazing theatrical run," he added. "That one is a complete head-scratcher. I honestly don't know if Disney has a master plan. I believe they are looking at each title at how it can best serve them instead of working with theaters."

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'We don't want to be a title just on Disney Plus'

Sources told Insider that when news came that "Luca" would be released on Disney Plus, it was frustrating, especially for those who love to see their work end up in theaters.

"We don't want to be a title just on Disney Plus," said one staffer, who is working on several of its coming feature films. "These movies are crafted for the big screen. We want you to watch these movies with no distractions, no looking at your phones."

There's also the question of sustainability: Pixar titles have ridden a box-office wave of success for decades. Both "Incredibles 2" in 2018 and "Toy Story 4" in 2019 earned over $1 billion worldwide at the box office. Some staff members wonder whether not going after box-office dollars, even during a pandemic, will be harmful in the long run.

Soul skyscraper ad AaronP Bauer Griffin GC Images Getty"If these movies aren't having $1 billion runs, does that hurt the company? You wonder that," one animator said.

A veteran staffer put the collective anxiety more bluntly: "Everyone is worried about keeping their jobs if our films aren't seen by Disney as financially successful."

Meanwhile, Vannorsdel believes Disney not allowing Pixar titles to play in theaters could have ramifications for the studio's other slate of movies.

"There's going to be less movie theaters for them to play their big-budget Marvel movies," Vannorsdel predicted, noting the recent close of Arclight Cinemas and Pacific Theaters in Los Angeles.

Dan Rayburn, a streaming media analyst, believes with streaming being so competitive right now, Disney needed to have Pixar titles released exclusively on Disney Plus to compete and bump up subscription numbers.

"Pixar is targeting a specific demographic and a lot of Disney Plus subscribers are families, so it makes sense if you're Disney that with Pixar you are going to target that more to your streaming service that has that kind of built-in membership," he told Insider. "They are going to do what makes the most money."

The Pixar atrium

'If I'm doing this so my name can be on the big screen, I'm doing it for the wrong reasons'

Not everyone at Pixar sees doom and gloom because the studio's movies aren't playing in theaters.

"For me, personally, if I'm doing this so my name can be on the big screen, I'm doing it for the wrong reasons," one artist said.

To some staffers, the bigger adjustment has been working from home, as the Pixar campus has been empty since the start of the pandemic.

"It has its pros and cons," one animator, who's now been working remotely for over a year, told Insider. "The con is you no longer can go bounce off an idea with a colleague and get inspired. But the pro is the work-to-life balance is exponentially better. If you're a night person, take a nap during the day, then you can get work done at night."

Some staff point out that with Pixar's recent funneling of projects to Disney Plus, the opportunity for those rising up the ranks in the company to get their stories made has increased substantially. For example, there's the SparkShorts series in which Pixar employees are given six months and a small budget to create shorts that will go directly the streamer. The series resulted in two Oscar-nominated shorts: 2019's "Kitbull" and 2020's "Burrow." 

And confidence is high that features currently in the works at Pixar — like the "Toy Story" spin-off movie "Lightyear"— will hit theaters.

But regardless of where they show up, several staff members at Pixar told Insider the same thing: The quality of what's being made hasn't been affected.

"There will not be a change on how we make the films," one animator said. "That's what's important; the piece of art. That's what matters."

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The 7 most anticipated new movie releases in May, from Netflix's 'Army of the Dead' to 'A Quiet Place Part II'

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7. "Spiral: From the Book of Saw"— in theaters, May 13

Description: "A sadistic mastermind unleashes a twisted form of justice in SPIRAL, the terrifying new chapter from the book of SAW. Working in the shadow of an esteemed police veteran (Samuel L. Jackson), brash Detective Ezekiel 'Zeke' Banks (Chris Rock) and his rookie partner (Max Minghella) take charge of a grisly investigation into murders that are eerily reminiscent of the city's gruesome past. Unwittingly entrapped in a deepening mystery, Zeke finds himself at the center of the killer's morbid game."



6. "Those Who Wish Me Dead"— in theaters and on HBO Max, May 14

Description: "From New Line Cinema comes the thriller 'Those Who Wish Me Dead,' starring Angelina Jolie and directed by Taylor Sheridan. Oscar winner Jolie ('Girl, Interrupted,' the 'Maleficent' films) stars as Hannah, a smoke jumper still reeling from the loss of three lives she failed to save from a fire when she comes across a traumatized 12-year-old boy with nowhere else to turn."



5. "Wrath of Man"— in theaters, May 7

Description: "A mysterious and wild-eyed new cash truck security guard (Jason Statham) surprises his coworkers during a heist in which he unexpectedly unleashes precision skills. The crew is left wondering who he is and where he came from. Soon, the marksman's ultimate motive becomes clear as he takes dramatic and irrevocable steps to settle a score."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 70%

What critics said: "At core, Wrath of Man is a revenge story: to invest in the complications, we need to believe in the hero's rage and the reasons behind it. But sincerity of any sort has never been Ritchie's strength."— The Age



4. "The Woman in the Window"— Netflix, May 14

Description: "Anna Fox (Amy Adams) feels safest when she's watching the world from behind her window. Until the Russell family moves in across the street, and she witnesses something unimaginable. The question is ...what really happened?"



3. "Army of the Dead"— in select theaters May 14, on Netflix May 21

Description: "From filmmaker Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen, Zack Snyder's Justice League), ARMY OF THE DEAD takes place following a zombie outbreak that has left Las Vegas in ruins and walled off from the rest of the world. When Scott Ward (Dave Bautista), a former zombie war hero who's now flipping burgers on the outskirts of the town he now calls home, is approached by casino boss Bly Tanaka (Hiroyuki Sanada), it's with the ultimate proposition: break into the zombie-infested quarantine zone to retrieve $200 million sitting in a vault beneath the strip before the city is nuked by the government in 32 hours. With little left to lose, Ward takes on the challenge, assembling a ragtag team of experts for the heist. With a ticking clock, a notoriously impenetrable vault, and a smarter, faster horde of Alpha zombies closing in, only one thing's for certain in the greatest heist ever attempted: survivors take all."



2. "Cruella"— in theaters and on Disney+ Premier Access, May 28

Description: "Academy Award winner Emma Stone ('La La Land') stars in Disney's 'Cruella,' an all-new live-action feature film about the rebellious early days of one of cinemas most notorious — and notoriously fashionable — villains, the legendary Cruella de Vil. 'Cruella,' which is set in 1970s London amidst the punk rock revolution, follows a young grifter named Estella, a clever and creative girl determined to make a name for herself with her designs. She befriends a pair of young thieves who appreciate her appetite for mischief, and together they are able to build a life for themselves on the London streets. One day, Estella's flair for fashion catches the eye of the Baroness von Hellman, a fashion legend who is devastatingly chic and terrifyingly haute, played by two-time Oscar winner Emma Thompson ('Howards End,' 'Sense & Sensibility'). But their relationship sets in motion a course of events and revelations that will cause Estella to embrace her wicked side and become the raucous, fashionable and revenge-bent Cruella."



1. "A Quiet Place Part II"— in theaters, May 28

Description: "Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family (Emily Blunt, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe) must now face the terrors of the outside world as they continue their fight for survival in silence. Forced to venture into the unknown, they quickly realize that the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats that lurk beyond the sand path."



What is BritBox? A brief guide to the British television and movie streaming service

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With streaming services becoming the preferred way for entertainment fans to consume their favorite TV shows and movies, these platforms are becoming more and more popular.  

BritBox, which bills itself as having the "biggest collection of British content on any streaming service"— more than Netflix, Acorn TV, and Hulu — is one such platform that Brits and Anglophiles in the US alike can enjoy. 

What is BritBox?

Launched in the US and Canada in March 2017 (and in the UK in November 2019), BritBox is a subscription-based movies and TV service, with roughly 1.5 million subscribers in North America. The service, which is a joint effort of the British TV networks ITV and BBC, is centered entirely around British television and movies. 

While both the North American and British versions of BritBox are pretty much identical, the key differences lie in the content library and offerings, with a smaller selection available with the US version. Both UK and US subscribers have access to BritBox Originals, however. 

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The North American version of BritBox operates mostly as a platform and content library to help expose non-UK audiences to British programming, while the UK version functions more as an archive of shows many subscribers will already know and love.

What BritBox shows and movies are available 

BritBox offers a variety of British comedies, mysteries, dramas, lifestyle, and docs both ad-free and on-demand, with many in their entirety.  Among the popular BritBox shows available to stream on the platform are "Downton Abbey,""Broadchurch,""Only Fools and Horses,""Doctor Who," and "Spooks."

Classic British movies including the "Carry On" films and several Hitchcock thrillers are also available, along with original programming. In total, there are more than 300 titles to choose from, with more being added regularly. 

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BritBox shows and movies are also available on the following platforms and devices:  

  • iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch
  • Android devices
  • Apple TV 
  • Roku
  • Smart TVs from Panasonic, Samsung, JVC, Logik, Polaroid, Sony, Toshiba, LG, Hisense, Hitachi, and Bush
  • Google Chromecast
  • TalkTalk TV
  • Freesat
  • BT TV
  • Amazon Fire TV
  • Mac or PC web browsers
  • Netgem
  • YouView

How much does BritBox cost?

Related Article Module: How much is BritBox? A cost breakdown for the British streaming service

If you want to sign up for BritBox, the company offers a free seven-day trial to give you a taste of what's available before committing to a monthly subscription. 

After the trial period ends, you'll pay $6.99 per month or $69.99 per year for HD video on multiple screens and devices. In the UK, the monthly subscription fee is £5.99 a month or £59.99 per year.

How to get BritBox on your smart TV and binge your favorite British showsWhat is Acorn TV? Everything you need to know about the streaming service that offers international showsHow to cancel your Acorn TV subscription no matter how you signed up for itHow to cancel subscriptions you made through Amazon and stop being charged for streaming services and apps

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The top 9 movies on Netflix this week, from 'The Mitchells vs. the Machines' to 'Scarface'

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9. "State of Play" (2009)

Description:"A veteran journalist teams up with a young reporter to untangle a web of lies surrounding the suspicious death of a woman tied to a powerful politician."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 84%

What critics said: "The three screenwriters may have been trying to work too many plot strands into two hours; in any case, State of Play is both overstuffed and inconclusive."— New Yorker

 



8. "Stowaway" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "A three-person crew on a mission to Mars faces an impossible choice when an unplanned passenger jeopardizes the lives of everyone on board."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 77%

What critics said: "It's a clever take on a familiar genre with a terrific cast, but the slow burn may be too slow."— RogerEbert.com 



7. "Scarface" (1983)

Description:"In a ruthless rise to Miami drug lord, a Cuban-born gangster descends into addiction, obsession and brutality, with grisly consequences."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 82%

What critics said: "Other than an unflinching, intense and extraordinary performance from Al Pacino as the Cuban-born gangster Tony Montana, this gruesome offering has little to recommend."— Hollywood Reporter



6. "Your Highness" (2011)

Description: "When an evil wizard kidnaps his bride-to-be, a valiant prince teams up with his deadbeat, stoner brother and a fiery warrior on a quest to rescue her."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 27%

What critics said: "Your Highness never sacrifices its cheerful, one-thing-after-another absurdity, or its inability to take itself even remotely seriously."— Film Comment



5. "Love Happens" (2009)

Description: "A self-help guru's failure to come to grips with his wife's death may cost him a chance at happiness with a quirky florist."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 16%

What critics said: "Call it a romantic comedy or romantic drama; you're still not going to giggle, your heart won't be warmed and ultimately, you'll leave unsatisfied."— Cinemablend 



4. "Green Zone" (2010)

Description: "A US Army officer uncovers a conspiracy about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, launching a crusade that creates enemies within his own military."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 53%

What critics said: "A jangly, noisy, compulsively restless thriller on a par with the Bourne movies, shot through with political critique."— Washington Post



3. "Things Heard and Seen" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "A young woman discovers that both her husband and their new home harbor sinister secrets after they leave Manhattan for small-town life."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 38%

What critics said: "You know a ghost story is a hot mess when it strands a stellar Amanda Seyfried and a top cast in a remote, country house haunted by toxic masculinity, dangling plot threads and nothing worth hearing or seeing."— ABC News



2. "Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted" (2012)

Description: "Next stop: New York! But to get back home, Alex and friends must hitch a ride with a traveling European circus and evade an evil animal-control officer."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 78%

What critics said: "Here is a family movie from which absolutely nothing is expected, and yet it's one of the week's best releases: a muscular, potent and very funny film."— Guardian



1. "The Mitchells vs. the Machines" (2021, Netflix original)

Description: "A robot apocalypse put the brakes on their cross-country road trip. Now it's up to the Mitchells — the world's weirdest family — to save the human race."

Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 98%

What critics said: "Take away the serrated satirical edges, and you're still left with a surprisingly delightful story about a dysfunctional family learning how to connect again."— Rolling Stone